Flow

FLOW: AN AESTHETIC SEQUENCE OF FORM, PROCESS, AND EXPERIENCE “Flow” is a multi-disciplinary art sequence that provides people with an experience of movement in and around Sky Harbor Airport’s new 44th Street Station. The 44th Street Station is part of Sky Harbor Airport’s new LEED Automated Train Project and includes a terminal, multi-modal transportation links, parkland, a canal, and a trail system. Integrated into both buildings and landscape, the art sequence includes new media artworks, eco-artworks, and sculptural gathering places that connect people to the Southwest region while triggering internal narratives that transport them to other places. The artworks are conceived as a series of cinematic frames and progressions and include green/water walls, a green roof, a solar veil for a pedestrian bridge, solar powered LED works, a media cloud, a media cascade, earthworks, waterworks, gathering places, parks, xeriscape plantings, pathways, and shade structures.

PROPOSED – Building Artwork

A series of vertical screens of plants and/or water are located adjacent to the escalators within the terminal building to provide multi-sensory experiences and sustainable strategies. The “Green Wall” acts as a biofilter that cleans and freshens the air. It cools air in summer and humidifies in winter using plants’ natural respiratory properties. The “Water Wall” is enclosed and uses reclaimed water to provide cooling by lowering air temperature through the latent heat of evaporation, changing water to vapor.

Lorna Jordan with Jones & Jones Architects and Landscape Architects and Brown and Caldwell Consulting Engineers, Waterworks Gardens: The Knoll, 1996. Grate-covered channel, basalt columns, plants, water, and paving, 11 x 34 x 100 ft.

PROPOSED – Building Artwork

A series of staggered media panels are attached to a sculptural set of faceted planes under side of escalators within the terminal building. The LED panels display imagery that transport people to other places through their imaginations and that build upon the idea of travel and motion. The faceted planes abstract the imagery on the LED’s and evoke the movement of the adjacent escalator steps.

PROPOSED – Building Artwork

An animated sequence of panels attached to the outside of a pedestrian bridge creates flowing forms and screens light. The “Solar Veil” reduces the amount of direct sunlight entering the pedestrian bridge interior, minimizing the reliance on the HVAC system.

PROPOSED – Landscape Artwork

This illustrative drawing shows the park landscape in front of the terminal building. Reminiscent of the platform mounds of the Hohokum Indians (some of which are located across the street at the ancient Pueblo Grande site ), this earth/water sculpture uses harvested and reclaimed water for irrigation and xeriscape plantings. By using earth excavated from another earth/water sculpture on site, it also helps to balances cut and fill on the project.

Sustainability: Energy, Water & Air Strategies

This presentation board shows sustainable strategies employed in some of the artworks for both buildings and landscape. These include water treatment, water reuse, green walls, water walls, solar panels, LED lighting, green roofs, and xeriscape plantings.

Sustainability: Water Strategies

This presentation board shows how stormwater, gray water, and HVAC water can be collected, treated, and reused in building and landscape artworks.

PROPOSED – Landscape Art Elements

These diagrams show the locations of art projects around the 44th Street Station terminal building. Integrated into both buildings and landscape, the art sequence includes new media artworks, eco-artworks, and sculptural gathering places that connect people to the Southwest region while triggering internal narratives that transport them to other places. The artworks are conceived as a series of cinematic frames and progressions and include green/water walls, a green roof, a solar veil for a pedestrian bridge, solar powered LED works, a media cloud, a media cascade, earthworks, waterworks, gathering places, xeriscape plantings, pathways, and shade structures.

PROPOSED – Building Art Elements

This diagram shows the locations of art projects in the 44th Street Station terminal building. Integrated into both buildings and landscape, the art sequence includes new media artworks, eco-artworks, and sculptural gathering places that connect people to the Southwest region while triggering internal narratives that transport them to other places. The artworks are conceived as a series of cinematic frames and progressions and include green/water walls, a green roof, a solar veil for a pedestrian bridge, solar powered LED works, a media cloud, a media cascade, earthworks, waterworks, gathering places, xeriscape plantings, pathways, and shade structures.

Project Credits

FLOW: AN AESTHETIC SEQUENCE OF FORM, PROCESS, AND EXPERIENCE “Flow” is a multi-disciplinary art sequence that provides people with an experience of movement in and around Sky Harbor Airport’s new 44th Street Station. The 44th Street Station is part of Sky Harbor Airport’s new LEED Automated Train Project and includes a terminal, multi-modal transportation links, parkland, a canal, and a trail system. Integrated into both buildings and landscape, the art sequence includes new media artworks, eco-artworks, and sculptural gathering places that connect people to the Southwest region while triggering internal narratives that transport them to other places. The artworks are conceived as a series of cinematic frames and progressions and include green/water walls, a green roof, a solar veil for a pedestrian bridge, solar powered LED works, a media cloud, a media cascade, earthworks, waterworks, gathering places, parks, xeriscape plantings, pathways, and shade structures.

PROJECT CREDITS:
Lorna Jordan, Artist Commissioned by Phoenix Office of Arts & Culture for the Automated Train Project at Sky Harbor Airport