Reach

“Reach” is a sculptural gathering place within the Edmonds Community College Campus. The artwork stretches up out of the ground, lifting and twisting to create an arched passageway. Aluminum ribs provide an armature for the sweeping form and are, in turn, draped with Alaskan yellow cedar boards. Undulating swaths of plantings connect the pavilion to the landscape. A bench provides a place to rest. PROJECT CREDITS:
Lorna Jordan, Artist
Krekow Jennings and 12th Avenue Iron, Fabrication A Project of the Washington State Arts Commission in cooperation with Edmonds Community College

ABOUT THE ARTWORK

Lorna Jordan’s site-specific installation ‘Reach’ defines both a pathway and a gathering space on the Edmonds Community College campus. The cedar and aluminum sculpture rises and twists to create an arched passageway. The sculpture includes a long bench within it that invites you to sit and be a part of the installation. The sculpture also includes the rippling plants around it that imitate its shape. Jordan notes that students and others on campus “are engaged as participants, not as spectators.”

This artwork was acquired for the State Art Collection in partnership with Edmonds Community College.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Seattle-based, environmental artist Lorna Jordan (1954-2021) created artworks that blur the boundaries between sculpture, theater, media, architecture, and ecology. She created public installations, often using sustainable materials. Her works invite reflection about our sense of place and our relationship to nature. In her own words, “My works are more than objects – they are ideas, places, and actions.”

Jordan received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville in 1976. She later studied at the University of Washington in Seattle.

“Reach” This is an overview of “Reach”, which is a sculptural gathering place with a cedar and aluminum pavilion that rises up from the ground-—lifting and twisting to create an arched passageway. Undulating swaths of plants echo the gesture of the pavilion and a bench provides a place to rest.